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Big Green Egg All-American Burger | IAmJoshBrown
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Big Green Egg All-American Burger

Big Green Egg All-American Burger

Big Green Egg burger recipes aren’t much different than any regular burger recipe. Make a patty with ground chuck. Put on fire. Put things from a garden on top. And eat. Honestly, and I hate to spill the beans, it’s not much different for the Big Green Egg. Making a hamburger on the Big Green Egg is about as limitless as your imagination and preference on ingredients.

 

That’s one of the great things about a good burger and why I think it’s become the all-american go-to choice for the grill. Sure being easy is a huge part of it. But being able to customize it a thousand different ways and to have a party or family be able to come up with unique customizations that are individualized for each person and their preferences makes it infinitely appealing.

 

So while this recipe may not be as creative or as good or as simple or as complicated as what you’ve probably conjured up in the past, it’s my family’s take on the all-american backyard staple.

biggreenegg_burger2

Here’s my only caveat to the ingredients. The following ingredients will allow you to serve 4-6 depending on how big you make the burgers. I typically make 1/2 lb. burgers utilizing the Big Green Egg Burger Press. Although you can make them slightly smaller or larger depending on your preference. I do not recommend making them much smaller than 1/3 lb. as they obviously shrink up on the grill. But if you create 1/4 lb. patties prior to putting them on the flame, they just shrivel up and dry out by the time you’re done and you might as well be using Bubba Burgers or some other flash frozen frisbee.

Making burgers without the Burger Press and then making burgers with them has made a huge difference. Creating a uniformed patty that is the same shape and size as the others makes your job easier when putting them on the grill. You don’t have to worry about one being burnt while the other is under cooked. So whether it’s the Big Green Egg Burger Press or another brand, spend the $10 or so it takes to get you one and make your life easier once you put them down on the flame.

One last thought . . . if you can afford it and have the time, buy yourself a meat grinder and make your own hamburger meat. My friends over at New South Food Company highly recommend it and these guys have a pretty good recipe and walk through here for you.

Ingredients:

2 lbs. of ground chuck (80/20)
2 cloves of garlic (crushed)
1 tsp. (smoked) paprika
1 tsp. Old Bay Seasoning
Arugula/Lettuce
1 Tomato
1 Purple Onion
Dill pickles
Cheddar Cheese Slice
Special Sauce (recipe forthcoming)

Before I start with the directions, it wouldn’t hurt you to take a peak here at some good pro tips on grilling hamburgers on the Big Green Egg.

Directions:

First, preheat the Big Green Egg to somewhere around 400-500 degrees. That’s a big temperature gap and I’ll give you the differences below. There is also a camp that says cook the burgers on super high heat for a short amount of time by pushing the temps northward of 600 degrees. But I’ve found that 500 degrees provides a more consistent cooked burger with a lower likelihood of charring the outside and undercooking the inside.

Now make the patties. Hand mix (2) cloves of crushed garlic, (1) tsp. paprika, (1) tsp. Old Bay seasoning, and the (2) lbs. of ground chuck in a bowl until everything is thoroughly and consistently mixed in together. Feel free to add in any other herbs or seasonings you want. Even mixing in some chopped onions adds a nice little bit of flavor. Just keep in mind that it is possible to overdo it. Be creative but keep it somewhat simple.

Here’s the breakdown on the temperatures. Keep in mind you should leave the lid open and not close it until you begin the dwelling phase or you need to kill a flame-up. If you’re going to grill the burgers around 400 degrees, do so for about 5 minutes per side. If you’re going to grill the burgers around 500 degrees, do so for about 3-4 minutes per side and then let them dwell for an additional 2 minutes. There is a good description of dwelling on the burger page of the Big Green Eggic site. Essentially when you’re done cooking the burgers over the open flame, you drop the lid and close the Daisy Wheel for an extra 2 minutes so that they continue cooking without the flame. This is the time you want to drop the cheese on them if you’re grilling them in the 500 degree range. If you’re grilling them in the 400 degree range, just drop the cheese on them in the last minute or so over the flame sans dwelling.

Finally, top the hell out of them with the ingredients listed above. Or use your own favorite toppings. Like we said in the beginning, it’s pretty hard to go wrong with the Big Green Egg. Even harder to go wrong with burgers and the Big Green Egg.

biggreenegg_burger1

Big Green Egg All-American Burger
Recipe Type: Big Green Egg
Author: IAmJoshBrown
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 2 lbs. of ground chuck (80/20)
  • 2 cloves of garlic (crushed)
  • 1 tsp. (smoked) paprika
  • 1 tsp. Old Bay Seasoning
  • Arugula/Lettuce
  • 1 Tomato
  • 1 Purple Onion
  • Dill pickles
  • Cheddar Cheese Slice
  • Special Sauce (recipe forthcoming)
Instructions
  1. First, preheat the Big Green Egg to somewhere around 400-500 degrees. That’s a big temperature gap and I’ll give you the differences below. There is also a camp that says cook the burgers on super high heat for a short amount of time by pushing the temps northward of 600 degrees. But I’ve found that 500 degrees provides a more consistent cooked burger with a lower likelihood of charring the outside and undercooking the inside.
  2. Now make the patties. Hand mix (2) cloves of crushed garlic, (1) tsp. paprika, (1) tsp. Old Bay seasoning, and the (2) lbs. of ground chuck in a bowl until everything is thoroughly and consistently mixed in together. Feel free to add in any other herbs or seasonings you want. Even mixing in some chopped onions adds a nice little bit of flavor. Just keep in mind that it is possible to overdo it. Be creative but keep it somewhat simple.
  3. Here’s the breakdown on the temperatures. Keep in mind you should leave the lid open and not close it until you begin the dwelling phase or you need to kill a flame-up. If you’re going to grill the burgers around 400 degrees, do so for about 5 minutes per side. If you’re going to grill the burgers around 500 degrees, do so for about 3-4 minutes per side and then let them dwell for an additional 2 minutes. There is a good description of dwelling on the burger page of the Big Green Eggic site. Essentially when you’re done cooking the burgers over the open flame, you drop the lid and close the Daisy Wheel for an extra 2 minutes so that they continue cooking without the flame. This is the time you want to drop the cheese on them if you’re grilling them in the 500 degree range. If you’re grilling them in the 400 degree range, just drop the cheese on them in the last minute or so over the flame sans dwelling.
  4. Finally, top the hell out of them with the ingredients listed above. Or use your own favorite toppings. Like we said in the beginning, it’s pretty hard to go wrong with the Big Green Egg. Even harder to go wrong with burgers and the Big Green Egg.